If you thought that solar panel arrays were only beneficial in states with copious amounts of sunshine like Arizona and Florida, you were mistaken. Despite a winter packed with some major snow storms, New Jersey-based World Class Flowers and Mercury Solar Systems were able to complete a 178 kW solar installation.

The new solar array includes 795 solar panels and four inverters, which will produce approximately 30 percent of World Class Flowers’ annual electricity needs – more than 215,000 kW/hr. The solar panel generated energy will reduce World Class Flowers carbon dioxide emissions by more than 150 pounds each year. To put this in easier to understand numbers, this is similar to the CO2 emissions saved when 3 million soda cans are recycled, 18,213 gallons of gasoline are saved, and 19 acres of trees are planted.

Mercury Solar Systems completed this installation and the company’s president, Jared Haines, commended the business for taking advantage of New Jersey’s solar renewable energy credits (SRECs). “World Class Flowers is a great example of how businesses in New Jersey can generate income off their roof. SREC’s are one of the most lucrative and powerful parts of the State’s rebate program and are helping businesses not only create long-term revenue streams but achieve a much quicker return on their solar investment.”

According to the New Jersey Clean Energy Program website, “New Jersey is the fastest growing markets for solar photovoltaic’s in the United States and one of the largest in terms of installations and installed capacity, second only to California. Much of this success is due to New Jersey’s Solar Financing Model, which relies on high renewable energy standards and the use of Solar Renewable Energy Credits (SRECs).”

New Jersey has more installed solar arrays than my home state, Arizona. It is sunny here. It is hot here. I even had solar panels on my house in the 1980s. However, the programs put in place by the New Jersey government are allowing for more businesses to take advantage of renewable energy and outpace installations in other, more traditionally sunny, places.