Climate change is one of the most covered, and most controversial, environmental crises facing the world.  My guess is that part of this controversy stems from the fact that many people think they know what climate change is but really only have a very cursory understanding of it.  The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is hosting a program geared at business executives.  “The ROI for Going Green” program is designed to help these executives learn more about climate change while keeping the financial bottom line in mind.

“To an investor, “green” is a strategy for identifying companies poised to profit from the changing climate. For corporate managers, “green” is a means of adjusting business practices to reduce waste and increase efficiency. Everyone is focused on the bottom line and for successful “green” initiatives there must be significant return on investment.”  Source: UCSD

The famed Scripps Institution of Oceanography is partnering with UCSD’s Rady School of Management to present the two-day conference.  The program features three keynote speakers: James Balog, nature photojournalist, Anita Burke, Founder of the Catalyst Institute, and Sarah Severn, Nike’s Director of Corporate Responsibility Horizons.  Additionally, speakers from UBS Wealth Management, Deutsche Bank Group, and WilderShares, LLC are just a few of the instructors slated to present on a wide variety of subjects during the conference.

The two-day program begins on May 7, 2009 and registration is currently available online.  Executives in the San Diego area may choose the local registration option.  The $1895 local registration fee includes parking and most meals.  Registration for out-of-town visitors is $2350 and includes two nights at the La Jolla Hotel & Spa, transportation to the UCSD campus, and most meals.  During the registration process, conference attendees can choose from two tracks on day two – green investing or corporate greening.

Photo by xymonau

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