For the last five years Climate Counts has published an annual company scorecard report, which ranks a company’s commitment to reducing emissions and preparing for a low-carbon future. Each company is given a numerical score, on a scale of 1-100, and then a corresponding green (striding), yellow (starting) or red (stuck) light. Mike Bellamente, project director at Climate Counts, noticed a shift in climate change awareness with 17 of the largest 20 companies assessed this year earning a striding score.

 

“In reviewing the results of our 5th annual company scoring process, there is evidence to suggest that we have reached a remarkable tipping point. Global corporations are increasingly acknowledging climate change as reality and are adopting measures to reduce their emissions and environmental impact. “ Source: Climate Counts (PDF)

 

There was also one more noticeable change in this year’s scorecard; Nike was missing from the top spot. After holding the number one position on the Climate Count’s Scorecard for the past three years, Nike dropped down to fourth place with a score of 85 points. This year Unilever came in first place with a score of 88, up five points from the company’s 2010-2011 score.

 

The 2011-2012 Climate Counts Scorecard top 10 is as follows:

 

  1. Unilever
  2. AstraZeneca
  3. Timberland
  4. Nike
  5. Siemens
  6. Hewlett-Packard
  7. Stonyfield Farm
  8. Bank of America
  9. IBM
  10. Baxter International
 

Each of these 10 companies earned scores of 81 or higher, good for a green light designation from Climate Counts. Of the 136 companies assessed in this year’s report, 13 scored 80 points or higher. Last year only four companies reached the 80-point threshold.

 

While this is good news for the overall state of green business, the news wasn’t so good in one industry – Toys/Children’s. Nine of the 13 companies assessed in the 2011-2012 Climate Counts Scorecard scored 12 points or less making Toy’s/Children’s the lowest performing sector this year. The highest performing business in the sector, Hasbro, scored a 52, which is just barely above the threshold needed for a striding (green light) score. Obviously the children’s industry has a lot of work to do in the combating climate change arena.

 

Learn more about the companies assessed this year by downloading the 2011-2012 Climate Counts Scorecard (PDF).