In September, the jobless rate for post-9/11 veterans climbed to 10.1 percent, almost three points higher than the nationwide unemployment rate of 7.2 percent for the same month.

Even though a private-sector coalition of 121 companies led by JPMorgan Chase recently announced that it had hired 92,869 veterans through the third quarter, it doesn’t seem to be enough.

But now Starbucks is jumping on the veteran bandwagon with a pledge of their own: to hire at least 10,000 veterans or their spouses over the next five years.

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz says it's difficult to understand the complexities of why transitioning back to civilian work is tricky, but that companies can help.

"Businesses and business leaders have an obligation and a responsibility to do something about that and to meet these people more than halfway," Schultz said.

Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who is a member of the Starbucks' board, says that sometimes when vets reenter the civilian workforce it can be hard to transition their skills. Because of that, Starbucks will have a recruiter specialized in hiring service members. The coffee giant also intends to have a program manager to help with veteran retention.

"It may be a little tougher for business at the beginning of the process, but I think the long-term benefits are tremendous," Gates said.

The company will also expand their profit sharing community stores to include five stores in military communities. From these stores, $.10 of every transaction will go to aid the transition of returning veterans and their families.

“The men and women of the U.S. military have always served as a source of inspiration. They inspire us in our service to the greater good and remind us of the importance of our ongoing commitment to our communities, partners, and everyday work,” notes Starbucks’ website. “Our need to hire partners who share these values and possess a mission driven-sensibility is critical to our future success.”

The jobs will run the gamut from making lattes to supply chain management.

Related stories on MNN: