Sure, a Bill Clinton-approved memoir penned by the co-founder of the U.S. Green Building Council or an in-depth look at garden irrigation with toilet water are poor substitutes for the latest Mary Higgins Clark paperback or a stack of trashy gossip mags. But in the event that you want to add a bit of sustainability-minded substance to your list of summertime beach reads, look no further. 

Below, you'll find my picks for freshly released or soon-to-be-released green home and garden books perfect for the beach, backyard hammock, well-shaded park bench, or wherever you happen to find yourself escaping to during the balmy months ahead. It's an eclectic assortment for sure, including tomes that will appeal to budget-minded home improvers, LEGO-loving architecture buffs, and those who have their finger on the pulse of the micro-housing movement. And if you're still catching up with spring's new releases in the world of eco-friendly architecture, gardening, and design, you'll find them here.

Any specific books that you're looking forward to spending some QT with this summer? 

"Natural Architecture Now 20: New Projects from Outside the Boundaries of Design" by Francesca Tatarella (Princeton Architectural Press) 8/5

“150 Best Sustainable House Ideas” by Francesc Zamora (Harper Design) 6/10

"LEGO Architecture: The Visual Guide" by Phil Wilkinson (DK Adult) 8/18

"Tiny House Living: Ideas for Living and Building Well in Less Than 400 Square Feet" by Ryan Mitchell (Betterway Home) 7/14

“The Wastewater Gardener: Preserving the Planet One Flush at a Time” by Mark Nelson (Synergetic Press) 6/30

"Velo-City: Architecture for Bikes" by Gavin Blyth (Prestel) 7/25

“Tiny Homes on the Move: Wheels and Water” by Lloyd Kahn (Shelter Publications)

"How to Fix Absolutely Anything" by Instructables.com (Skyhorse Publishing)

“Explosion Green: One Man’s Journey to Green the World’s Largest Industry” by David Gottfried (Morgan James) 6/2

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Matt Hickman ( @mattyhick ) writes about design, architecture and the intersection between the natural world and the built environment.