Today, the day after Super Bowl XLVI, I’m going to go out on a not-very-long limb and guess that many of you may be on the market for an effective and affordable stain remover. Normally, when distracted by Madonna and/or very expensive television commercials, I tend to display an advanced level of sloppiness. This year however, I emerged unscathed and unstained although there was a couple of close calls with a dish of Dijon mustard and a squirt bottle of Hershey chocolate sauce. Maybe I lucked out because I stopped watching the Super Bowl after the half-time show. A sacrilege, I know, but watching Madge lip-sync while doing cartwheels was exhausting!

 

But I digress. If you take a quick look around MNN, you’ll find no shortage of DIY stain-busting ideas using household miracle workers like white vinegar, baking soda, and lemon juice. But for those of you looking for an effective commercial solution, here’s a long-trusted one that was recently treated to a stunning yet simple makeover: Stain Solver oxygen bleach.

 

I’ve never purchased Stain Solver and rarely use non-chlorine powdered bleach for household cleaning tasks aside from a small box that I break out on laundry days. But as someone whose cleaning product purchasing decisions are based heavily on innovative packaging, I gotta that I love what they’ve — huge props to the folks at Labor for the rebranding — done here: The 2.2 pound “Little Beauty” now comes in an oversized clear jar with minimal labeling, giving it a clever and homey look that’s geared towards design-conscious, glass-jar collecting nouveau homesteaders or anyone who would rather proudly display their cleaning products than hide them away.

Sure, the larger sizes of Stain Solver — behold, the “Supreme Commander” and the “Outdoorsman” — still come in big plastic tubs but the new labeling is evident here as well, rendering them a touch less hideous/janitorial than other options (Stain Solver was always pretty low-key and Kiehls-esque on the packaging front to begin with). Plus, the Stain Solver website is clean, easy-to-navigate, and a bit cheeky where it needs to be. 


Explain Minneapolis-based design firm Labor:

 

Stain Solver is a true original. For the last 15 years (long before the ‘trendy’ green cleaning product revolution), Stain Solver has been a leader in the ‘human friendly’ Oxygen Bleach category. We endeavored to create a minimal identity system that sets Stain Solver apart from the typical heavy-handed cleaning product approach. It was a joy to redesign the 50lb bulk bucket that is often associated with nasty chemicals or Home Depot shopping. Now you can simply look through the new translucent square pail to see your Stain Solver like freshly fallen snow.
 

Nontoxic and safe for use around kids and pets, the green appeal of made-in-the-USA Stain Solver is not necessarily just in its food-grade ingredients but in its versatility as well: it can be used to remove stains from just about anything — the Stain Solver website lists “red wine, blueberry, beet juice, body oils and perspiration, carpet stains, grass stains, cooking grease, blood stains, mud, mildew, oil, pet accidents, carpet stains, and countless others" — eliminating the need for investing in an arsenal of specialized cleaners and stain removers that may be harsher on the planet. One container will do it all and last a long time while doing it. Consider this: one 2.2 pound jar of Stain Solver makes 8 gallons of cleaning solution which is enough to fill 42 24-oz spray bottles. And interesting enough, Stain Solver was created by builder/remodeler/home improvement guru Tim Carter of AsktheBuilder.com.

 

My suggestion: Keep a couple around the house (one in the kitchen and one in the laundry room or garage, perhaps) and wrap the rest in little blue ribbons and save ‘em as host/hostesses gifts for Super Bowl 2013 or any other social events where blood stains, beet juice, and BBQ sauce may be an issue. All and all, a rebranding homerun.

 

Via [Trendhunter]

 

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