Last week, at around the same time I was checking out (and salivating over) L.A.-based design firm Poketo’s new line of handcrafted urban garden accessories, I caught wind of another standout collection of gorgeous gardening products ideal for space-strapped, design-conscious greenthumbs.

This line of “environmentally attuned products that enable the creation of unique garden environments” comes from Philadelphia-based studio Shift_Design and although it may be more appropriate for gardening on a slightly larger scale (a backyard may be needed) than the indoor-oriented Poketo collection, the products are still decidedly city-friendly.

Comprised of rainwater collection tanks and a complementary hose reel; modular growing solutions including a window box, planter, herb garden, living wall, and green roof tiles; a solar shade; and a beauty of a fire pit/ice chest for alfresco get-togethers (bottle opener included), Shift_Design’s fully recyclable, flat-pack stainless steel products are designed to tread ever-so-lightly on the environment. In addition to the reduced waste and shipping-related emissions associated with the products’ ingenious flat-pack nature, Shift-Design follows a nodal manufacturing process where each product is locally produced, no further than 120 transport miles from the buyer.

Perhaps most importantly, Shift_Design’s “product systems are created with an emphasis on ease of install that on the residential scale allows for Do-It-Yourself projects.”

I’m pretty much in love. For now, most of the Shift_Design line can be purchased online directly through Shift_Design or at the always-fantastic Horne. Or, for those in the Philly area, they can be purchased in-person at Greenable. Although prices for each item are decidedly on the higher end — Funston, the aforementioned fire pit/ice chest is $750 — Shift_Design's carbon-cutting design and manufacturing is still certainly worth admiring.

Via [Inhabitat]

Matt Hickman ( @mattyhick ) writes about design, architecture and the intersection between the natural world and the built environment.