While everyone else is combing through seed catalogs, buying seed packets and carefully planting seeds to get their tomato starters going, you can grow your tomato plants quicker and easier, following this easy-peasy tomato slice method.

Little Things demonstrates just how easy it is to take a tomato that's past its prime, slice it up, and plant the slices. In about two weeks, you should have dozens of tomato plant starters. You can pick and choose the biggest ones to continue growing.

If you've purchased a few tomatoes that were particularly flavorful, this would be a great way to attempt to grow more of them. Just let one of them sit out until it's ready for slicing and planting. Be aware, though, that it's more than just seeds that affect a tomato's flavor. The soil they're grown in has a lot to do with it, too, so you may not replicate the flavor exactly.

And, if you're worried about accidentally growing a tomato that contains GMO seeds, you don't need to worry. There are no commercial GMO tomatoes on the market in the United States, according to NPR. Any tomato you've bought at the market can't be grown from genetically modified seeds.

Robin Shreeves ( @rshreeves ) focuses on food from a family perspective from her home base in New Jersey.