Can you identify these trees based on their flowers?

All trees are beautiful, but flowering trees? Total show-stoppers. They go from humble to ostentatious with their raucous display, making us winter-weary admirers swoon with their profusion of blooms. Test your petal prowess and see which of these trees you know from their flowers alone.

Question 1 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree are these flowers from?

Cercis canadensis also goes by the names Judas tree and redbud. It’s one of the first to bloom in the spring throughout the lower Great Plains and eastern United States and is a favorite of butterflies, honeybees, hummingbirds … and humans.

Question 2 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree is this flower from?

Cornus florida is distributed throughout the eastern United States. We love its flowers; the gray squirrel, fox squirrel, bobwhite, cedar waxwing, cardinal, flicker, mockingbird, robin, wild turkey and woodpecker love its fruit.

Question 3 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree are these flowers from?

Native to the southeastern U.S. but hardy into the northern zones, Chionanthus virginicus is beloved for its wonderfully showy flowers and their heady fragrance.

Question 4 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree are these flowers from?

Jacaranda mimosifolia is native to South America, but its striking purple-blue blooms have made it a popular tree in U.S. zones where frost is short-lived. 

Question 5 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree is this flower from?

Magnolia x soulangeana was developed in the early 1800s and is the most popular deciduous magnolia in cultivation today. With those dreamy, dramatic yet graceful blossoms, is it any wonder?
 

Question 6 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree are these flowers from?

Although there are a number of flowering cherry species, Prunus × yedoensis comprises most of the trees celebrated in the Washington, D.C., cherry blossom festival, as well as other cherry blossom festivals around the world.

Question 7 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree are these flowers from?

The Lagerstroemia species is native to China and Korea, but with its interesting form and frilly blossoms – which are delivered in shades ranging from deep red to white and everything in between – it has become a dominant landscape element throughout the southern U.S.
 

Question 8 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree are these flowers from?

The strange flowers from the Morus family come from trees that are common around the world. Their fruit is popular for use in jams, jellies, drinks and many other uses; their leaves are consumed by silkworms.

Question 9 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree is this flower from?

The magnificent flowers of Magnolia grandiflora are giant, creamy, dramatic and wonderfully fragrant, which along with the tree's deep glossy leaves and stately size, make it a favorite in hardiness zones 6 through 10.

Question 10 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree is this flower from?

Cydonia oblonga may not produce fruit ready to pluck from the tree and eat on the spot – quince are pretty awful to eat prior to being cooked – but once the magic of heat transforms them into jellies, jams and any number of desserts, they are a true pleasure to consume.

Question 11 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree are these flowers from?

With its burst of snowy, showy spring blooms – as well as its hardiness in the face of drought and pollution – Pyrus calleryana is one of the most popular urban trees ... even if it does have a particularly memorable aroma.

Question 12 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree are these flowers from?

Members of the Crataegus family are the workhorses of trees; they provide nectar for insects, leaves for butterfly food, fruit that is eaten by many birds and mammals, and fruit that is widely put to good culinary use by humans across the globe. Hawthorn has long been used in traditional medicine, and now western medicine is jumping on the bandwagon with numerous studies looking at its cardiovascular health benefits.

Question 13 of 13

Score: 0

Which tree is this flower from?

Residents of California in particular may recognize the distinctive blooms of eucalyptus globulus, as the trees play a starring role in the arboreal landscape of the state.

You scored out of 13
SPONSORED
SPONSORED