It's no big secret that reclaimed wood flooring often runs the risk of being cost-prohibitive (case in point: Fontenay’s beautiful $32 per square foot reclaimed wine barrel flooring that’s been making the rounds on the green blogosphere lately) or looking too reclaimed and giving your home an unwanted saloon-of-the-Old-West-vibe.

Enter Staybull Flooring, a Florida-based company that produces long-lasting reclaimed plank wood flooring that won’t break the bank (it starts at $4.50 per square foot … not the cheapest option but not outrageous for the quality of the product) and doesn't fall into the questionable super-rustic wood flooring aesthetic. A release passed along to me earlier this week from Staybull earlier sums it up perfectly: “Unlike antique reclaimed flooring, the recycled wood flooring that Staybull™ produces offers a multi-faceted foundation that complements the clean and bright look that modern and contemporary green design calls for.”

The manufacturing process behind Staybull Flooring is quite unique, too. Essentially, the company sources strips of hardwood flooring waste that would otherwise be burned or ground into sawdust by lumber mills across the world. Next, the company binds the squandered wood strips using a VOC/solvent-free adhesive and then adds Eco-Shield hardwood floor finish. And as the company is proud to point out, this is all done domestically in the US.

And Staybull just doesn’t offer a couple of different flooring options. Over 20 species are available, both domestic and exotic. That’s Canary Wood pictured up top and a glimpse of a room with American Cherry following that. 

Take a look around the Staybull website to read more about the flooring options (samples!), local a dealer, peruse a list of green flooring FAQs, and keep up to speed with eco-flooring news. What are your thoughts on “new” reclaimed wood? Are you fan of the look or would you rather go with another popular green flooring option like bamboo?

Matt Hickman ( @mattyhick ) writes about design, architecture and the intersection between the natural world and the built environment.