Portable Home ÁPH80, a minimalist micro-home concept from family-run sustainable architecture firm Ábaton, managed to drum up quite a bit of attention 'round the green design blogosphere when it was first unveiled this past summer.

Manufactured in a factory in northern Spain using CNC technology within a quick four to six week timeframe, the petite and pared-down dwelling clad in cement-board panels is designed, true to its name, to be portable — that is, just like a rather large piece of furniture, the home will go where you need it to go, provided that you have access to a flatbed truck and a crane along with several hours to install the thing (and as evidenced in the above video, some kind of permit doesn't hurt).

As I put it in my previous post on ÁPH80, the concept is a careful exercise in balance and restraint, designed to project an overall sense of “well-being, environmental balance, and simplicity.”

Kirsten Dirksen of Barcelona-based faircompanies, who also documented Ábaton's transformation of a derelict cow shed into a self-sustaining retreat in the stunning Spanish countryside, was on hand to capture the installation of the fully plumbed and wired prototype ÁPH80 model at a decidedly less bucolic vacant lot on the outskirts of Madrid.

At a little longer than 30 minutes, it's one of faircompanies' longer videos, but it's certainly worth watching the entire thing and not just for the tour of a prefab home that, as faircompanies puts it, possesses "the style and usability of a smartphone." Throughout the video — and particularly toward the end — architect Camino Alonso and her family share some beautiful words on the topic of living with less: "I think now we're realizing we don't need a big space to be happy. So these things are a way to return to the essential of things — what truly makes you happy. A book, it doesn't take more at times. Nature, it's free. It's a luxury — you don't have to pay to enjoy it. The birds sing even if you say nothing."

Via [faircompanies]

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Matt Hickman ( @mattyhick ) reports on design, architecture and the intersection between the natural world and the built environment.