This weekend marks the unofficial start of summer (yippee!) meaning that the thousands of homeowners with the luxury of having outdoor pools are opening ‘em up for the season.

Last summer, I published a brief series of posts addressing ways to green backyard swimmin’ holes through chlorine alternatives, solar pool covers/heaters, and eco-friendly pool accessories. I also took a look at, um, repurposed dumpster swimming pools. If you have a pool yourself and missed any of these posts the first time around and are looking to save both water and energy — operating a pools requires huge amounts of both  — and cut sanitizing chemicals out of the equation, I suggest you take a peep.

And not to assume a Donald Downer role and further spoil the wet n’ wild summer fun but I thought I’d share a haunting and “heavy” short film called “Cannonball” from the thought-provoking California is a Place video series. The film, directed/produced by Drea Cooper and Zackary Canepari, chronicles the repurposing of derelict swimming pools on foreclosed properties in the Fresno area … by skateboarders.

TreeHugger’s Warren McLaren beautifully sums up Cannonball’s main thinking point:

With the northern hemisphere approaching summer, this melancholy video of skateboarders repurposing swimming pools on foreclosed properties, seemed an apt reminder of the perils inherent in "me-too" materialism. Individual household swimming pools are one of those personal luxuries we may chose to rethink, if we care about a transition to more sustainable lifestyles. Do we really all need to have a swimming pool parked in our individual backyards?
It’s worth a watch (be aware of NSFW language throughout) and will certainly give you something to chew on while doing laps in your own pool this holiday weekend. 

Matt Hickman ( @mattyhick ) writes about design, architecture and the intersection between the natural world and the built environment.