Why this southern white rhino's pregnancy is a big deal

May 18, 2018, 3:38 p.m.
Southern white Rhino
Photo: Tammy Spratt, photographer/San Diego Zoo Safari Park

A southern white rhino named Victoria at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park is expecting, and while any pregnancy is reason to celebrate, this one has the potential to save an animal essentially poached out of existence.

If her pregnancy through artificial insemination is successful, it could be a significant step in helping the northern white rhino recover.

Only two northern white rhinos, a distant subspecies, are alive; both are female but they cannot bear a calf. The last northern white male rhino, named Sudan, was euthanized in March at a preserve in Kenya due to age-related health problems.

Researchers hope that one day Victoria could serve as a surrogate mother, giving birth to a northern white rhino baby. They're optimistic that a northern white calf could be born this way within 10 to 15 years, and the work could also be applied to other rhino species, including critically endangered Sumatran and Javan rhinos.

"The confirmation of this pregnancy through artificial insemination represents an historic event for our organization, but also a critical step in our effort to save the northern white rhino," said Barbara Durrant, Ph.D., director of reproductive sciences at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research.

Victoria is one of six female southern white rhinos relocated to the San Diego park from private reserves in South Africa. The San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research is conducting tests on all of them to see if they would be successful as surrogate mothers.

Victoria the rhino's ultrasound Researchers point out the calf in Victoria's ultrasound. (Photo: Tammy Spratt, photographer/San Diego Zoo Safari Park)

Seven-year-old Victoria is the first to become pregnant. Researchers will be watching her closely to to see if she will successfully carry her calf through the gestation period, which typically lasts 16 to 18 months.

The zoo institute has the cells of 12 individual northern white rhinos stored at its "Frozen Zoo." Scientists hope to convert those preserved cells to stem cells, which could develop into sperm and eggs to be used to artificially inseminate the female southern white rhinos.

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