Human babies take a long time to do things. They just hang out, letting their parents carry them around for months before they even think about hoisting themselves up and taking a step or two.

Animal babies are a whole different story. Most of them are up on their feet within minutes, hours or at least a few days of being born. Those first moments are wobbly, but not long after, they're gracefully running or scurrying about, chasing their mothers around with glee.

Here's a look at a few animal babies getting to their feet for the first time or taking a few unsure steps.

Sometimes first steps start out with a little backward motion. But eventually this newborn polar bear cub gets the hang of it at the Toronto Zoo.

Standing up takes a lot of effort sometimes, even if you have a trunk to help you balance. The Bushcamp Company managed to spy on this little elephant struggling to get to his feet after a nap in Zambia.

At a mere 13 days old, not only does this kitten stand, but he takes some pretty amazing wobbly steps, completing a circuit of his area and impressing his less adventurous littermates, before collapsing from his efforts.

This Andalusian foal stands up for the first time outside in a field just hours after being born while his very chill mom continues to munch on grass.

It's hard to get up when you have legs that seem like they're miles long. Little Sandy Hope the baby giraffe finally makes it to his feet at the LEO Zoological Conservation Center in Greenwich, Connecticut, as his mom, Petal, watches. He was named in honor of the victims and families of the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy in nearby Newtown.

With lots of curious animal onlookers and a very attentive mom, this newborn miniature Texas longhorn calf stands up for the first time. You can almost hear everyone cheering her on.

This baby zebra took its first steps only about 30 minutes after being born. The big moment was filmed by a keeper at the Safari Ramat Gan wildlife park in Tel Aviv.

With an encouraging hand from mom, this baby gorilla takes its first steps.

Once Jellybean the Eastern grey kangaroo joey started to take his first steps ... er hops ... there was no stopping him. The little guy bounced all around his mom at the Australian Reptile Park, a wildlife sanctuary north of Sydney.

Mary Jo DiLonardo writes about everything from health to parenting — and anything that helps explain why her dog does what he does.