Like something straight out of a Vincent van Gogh painting, Jupiter's stormy atmosphere is our solar system's own stunning work of art.

The above image was captured in late October by NASA's Juno spacecraft at a distance of less than 12,000 miles above the Jovian cloud tops. According to NASA scientist Jack Connerney, deputy principal investigator of the Juno mission, previous images of Jupiter have been taken at the equator where orange, red, and white hues dominate.

"But Juno, for the first time, took images of Jupiter from the poles," he told NPR in May. "And when you look down from the poles ... it's an entirely different image. It's almost — well, I wouldn't say almost — it is unrecognizable as Jupiter. And what you see are these cyclones, groups of cyclones, dancing around the poles, intricate storms."

Juno snapped this photo of Jupiter during its seventh close pass in May 2017.
Juno snapped this photo of Jupiter during its seventh close pass in May 2017. (Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt /Seán Doran)

With an atmosphere that best resembles the sun, Jupiter is predominantly made up of hydrogen and helium, with trace amounts of ammonia, sulfur, methane and water vapor. Strong east-west winds in the planet's upper atmosphere travel at 400 mph, with dark belts and light zones reflecting different compositions of chemicals.

According to Juno principal investigator Scott Bolton, the white clouds shown in the image above are so high and so cool that they're likely snow clouds. As you might expect, they're a bit different than the icy storms we experience here on Earth.

"It's probably mostly ammonia ice, but there may be water ice mixed into it, so it's not exactly like the snow that we have [on Earth]," Bolton told Space.com. "And I was using my imagination when I said it was snowing there — it could be hail."

A view of Jupiter's south pole as captured by the Juno spacecraft.
A view of Jupiter's south pole as captured by the Juno spacecraft. (Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt /Seán Doran)

In May, NASA was surprised to discover that the poles of Jupiter are dominated by violent cyclones measuring hundreds of miles across. The massive tempests are densely grouped and seemingly rub together across the entire polar region.

“What you see is incredibly complex features, the cyclones and anticyclones all over the poles,” Bolton told the NY Times.

The familiar orange, yellow, and brown swirls of cloud systems near Jupiter's equator.
The familiar orange, yellow, and brown swirls of cloud systems near Jupiter's equator. (Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt /Seán Doran)

Some of the massive storms churning away near Jupiter's equator, like the pearl-colored cyclone above, are roughly the same diameter as Earth. The planet's Great Red Spot, one of the solar system's most recognizable features, is a storm measuring nearly 10,000 miles across.

A view of a massive storm on Jupiter as captured by the Juno spacecraft in October 2017 from a distance of only 6,281 miles.
A view of a massive storm on Jupiter as captured by the Juno spacecraft in October 2017 from a distance of only 6,281 miles. (Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt /Seán Doran)

Juno, which has been in orbit around Jupiter since July 2016, is scheduled to continue gathering data on the planet until at least July 2018. NASA will then make a decision to either extend the spacecraft's mission or, like Cassini's tour of Saturn, send it into a death plunge towards the gas giant to avoid contaminating nearby worlds.

“We’re very excited about what we’ve seen so far, and every time we fly by the planet it’s like Christmas time,” Juno project manager Rick Nybakken told SpaceFlight Now. “The data is stunning.”