When the Great American Eclipse begins its 2,500-mile-long trek across the United States on Aug. 21, spectators will be able to catch a rare celestial phenomenon within the narrow path of totality — and also enjoy some delicious waffles and possibly spy Bigfoot.

These hilarious associations are part of a growing challenge on social media to turn NASA's Path of Totality map, the sites where the moon's shadow will completely obscure the sun, into something else entirely. You can spy the original map below.

A map showing how the Great American Eclipse will appear from different points in the United States. A map showing how the Great American Eclipse will appear from different points in the United States. (Photo: NASA)

From that one graphic, many more have sprung showing such information as the odds of clear skies on the big day, state-by-state search inquiries on the topic, potential traffic congestion, and much more. When someone quipped on Twitter that no other eclipse maps were possible, NASA senior visualizer and cartographer Joshua Steven accepted the challenge.

The internet being the internet, the fun took off from there.

Singer Bonnie Tyler would absolutely applaud this map.

Should you feel sleepy after the eclipse, Ed Harrell has your caffeine fix mapped.

Hungry? University of Georgia geographer Jerry Shannon has you "smothered and covered."

And finally, the best place to see the eclipse from the upside-down world of "Stranger Things" is, well ...

Michael d'Estries ( @michaeldestries ) covers science, technology, art, and the beautiful, unusual corners of our incredible world.