A spacecraft launch in Kazakhstan turned into a scary situation as a booster malfunctioned mid-launch, sending the space crew into ballistic decent.

Astronaut Nick Hague of NASA and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of the Russian space agency Roscosmos luckily returned to Earth safely and are in good condition.

You can see the malfunction and the Russian Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft abort its mission in the video above.

After the launch, when the camera shifts to the crew inside, a quick camera shot shows pieces of the booster burning in the sky.

The Oct. 11 launch occurred at 4:40 a.m. EST, and the capsule's ballistic decent occurred not long after at a sharper landing angle compared to a normal landing.

Roscosmos is forming a state commission to investigate the Soyuz launch incident, according to NASA. The Russian space agency tweeted the photos below of the two-man space crew to show they were okay.

NASA released a statement on the incident that says in part:

“NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and the NASA team are monitoring the situation carefully. NASA is working closely with Roscosmos to ensure the safe return of the crew. Safety of the crew is the utmost priority for NASA. A thorough investigation into the cause of the incident will be conducted.”

Ben Bolton looks at everything through a video lens.

Booster failure forces space crew to abort mission mid-launch
A spacecraft launch in Kazakhstan turned into a scary situation as a booster malfunctioned mid-launch, sending the space crew into ballistic decent.