So many of the images from Hurricane Harvey are haunting. People affected by the storm wade through water, devastated by unbelievable losses. But amid the destruction and sadness are the hopeful images of four-legged survivors.

Some are clutched by their owners, while others have been left behind in the melee or are strays, confounded by the flooding and rising water. Here's a look at some of the animals battling the aftermath of the storm, some with human help and others not.

Volunteers and officers from the neighborhood security patrol help to rescue residents and their dogs in the flooded River Oaks neighborhood.
Volunteers and members of the neighborhood security patrol help to rescue residents and their dogs in the flooded River Oaks neighborhood. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

As people evacuatef their homes, rescuers came by boat to help them navigate the floodwaters. Fortunately, in many cases, family pets were loaded on board, too.

Horses were turned loose in rising waters in Rosharon, Texas.
Horses were turned loose in rising waters in Rosharon, south of Houston. (Photo: Ashley McCool Myers/Facebook)

That obviously wasn't the case for larger animals like livestock. Often, horses and cattle were set free in hopes they would find their way to higher ground. Animal rescuers — often from across the country — are arriving in Texas with trailers and supplies in hopes of rounding up these animals. Dry stalls, pastures and donated feed await.

Austin Pets Alive command center, puppy
Austin Pets Alive is operating as a command center, taking in hundreds of animals from Houston. (Photo: Austin Pets Alive/Facebook)

Shelters and rescue groups braced for the influx of animals expected to arrive in the days and weeks after the storm. Many groups throughout the country took in pets already in Houston-area shelters to make room for all the animals expected to fill local kennels.

John Tuan returns to rescue his dog who was left in his flooded house in the Clodine area of Houston after Hurricane Harvey caused heavy flooding.
John Tuan returns to rescue his dog who was left in his flooded house in the Clodine area of Houston after Hurricane Harvey caused heavy flooding. (Photo: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Some pets were lucky enough to stay dry during their rescues.

A cat tries to find dry ground around an apartment complex.
A cat tries to find dry ground around an apartment complex. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

While others had to brave the waters, like this none-too-pleased cat.

People and their pets check in to a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston.
People and their pets check in to a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston. (Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

During Hurricane Katrina, about 44 percent of those who didn't evacuate stayed because they didn't want to leave their pets. In response, Congress passed the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards (PETS) Act in 2006, which authorized FEMA to rescue, care, shelter and take care of people with pets and service animals.

After Harvey, many shelters (like the George R. Brown Convention Center, above) are accepting people along with their pets.

Alex Delarosa rescues a dog clinging to a guardrail.
Alex Delarosa rescues a dog clinging to a guardrail. (Photo: Jess Hernandez/Facebook)

Eager to find the good amid all the heartbreak, the heroics of rescuers are still passed along through social media. "Not all heroes wear capes... But this guy does," wrote one poster on Facebook, as a garbage bag-wearing Alex Delarosa saved a dog clinging to a guardrail to avoid rushing floodwaters.

People walk dogs through flooded streets in Galveston, Texas.
People walk dogs through flooded streets in Galveston, Texas. (Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Dogs were seen trudging dutifully alongside their owners through the floodwater.

A father and son carry their dog in a kennel as they evacuate from their home in Lakeside Estate in Houston.
A father and son carry their dog in a kennel as they evacuate from their home in Lakeside Estate in Houston. (Photo: Thomas B. Shea/AFP/Getty Images)

While some made the trip via kennel, as their owners refused to leave them behind.

a man carries a dog through floodwaters in Texas
As animal rescue groups and shelters are filling up with pets, they are sending out pleas for donations and temporary fosters. (Photo: Houston Pets Alive/Facebook)

While boats and trucks braved storm debris and water to save anyone left behind, rescuers scooped up as many animals as they could find, hoping to eventually reunite them with their owners.