Sphynx cat wearing a pink sweater
Sphynx cat wearing a pink sweater (Photo: Sergey Skleznev/Shutterstock)

Felines are regularly cast as the villains in movies and television. From Shere Khan of "The Jungle Book" to Catwoman of the Batman comics franchise, kitties always seem to be up to no good.

Of course, while these characters should be celebrated as the classic and essential villains they are, it's still disheartening to witness the good name of cats everywhere besmirched by Hollywood.

One feline breed that's often regarded with unwarranted wariness is the Sphynx cat. With its gaunt, angular face, alien-like eyes and uncanny, chamois-like skin, this nearly hairless kitty is often characterized as ugly, creepy or even evil. However, anyone who has ever spent some time with a Sphynx knows that this elegant creature can't be viewed through that lens.

This sphynx kitten is so tiny that it can even fit in the palm of a hand.
This Sphynx kitten is so tiny that it fits in the palm of a hand. (Photo: Olga Dmitrieva/Shutterstock)

At first glance, you might wonder if these striking kitties originated in a hot desert region where a fur coat was unnecessary, but believe it or not, they hail from Canada, where the breed was first developed in the 1960s from a random genetic mutation.

That's right — they're cat mutants. Of course, if the legacy of the X-Men series is any indication, that's not necessarily a bad thing! (Not to mention that we're all technically mutants if you really think about it.)

CarbonCat hangs out in front of a window.
CarbonCat hangs out in front of a window. (Photo: Shannon Badiee/Flickr)

While they are definitely unconventional looking when compared to more hirsute cat breeds, that doesn't make them any less lovable. On the contrary! Due to their exceptionally extroverted, curious and affectionate nature, Sphynx cats are generally considered to be one of the most dog-like cat breeds.

Their friendly disposition isn't the only reason they're compared to canines. Because they don't have fur to absorb oils, Sphynxes require regular baths like dogs:

Best of all? Thanks to their near hairlessness, they are heat-seeking creatures, which means they're always happy to cuddle up with you.

Continue below to see more photos of these lovely felines that unequivocally prove that "bald is beautiful!"

Who can resist a basket of tiny Sphynx kittens?
Who can resist a basket of tiny Sphynx kittens? (Photo: Oleg Mikhaylov/Shutterstock)
This lovely Sphynx cat is on the prowl for a new adventure!
This lovely Sphynx cat is on the prowl for a new adventure! (Photo: otsphoto/Shutterstock)
The tortoise shell coloring of this Sphynx cat is off-the-charts gorgeous.
The tortoise shell coloring of this Sphynx cat is off-the-charts gorgeous. (Photo: bonzodog/Shutterstock)
This adorable newborn sphynx kitten just recently opened its eyes for the first time.
This adorable newborn Sphynx kitten just recently opened its eyes for the first time. (Photo: Denis Tabler/Shutterstock)
With this adorable red hoodie, there's no Sphynx cat more hip than CarbonCat.
With this adorable red hoodie, there's no Sphynx cat more hip than CarbonCat. (Photo: Shannon Badiee/Flickr)
A very content Sphynx cat bathes in the sunlight of a window.
A very content Sphynx cat bathes in the sunlight of a window. (Photo: Golovko Ivan/Shutterstock)
A little sphynx kitty scratches an itch.
A little Sphynx kitty scratches an itch. (Photo: olena2552/Shutterstock)
A spotted Sphynx cat curls up on a blanket.
A spotted Sphynx cat curls up on a blanket. (Photo: Vitalii Tiagunov/Shutterstock)
All in all, a Sphynx cat is just like any other cat — fascination with balls of yarn included!
All in all, a Sphynx cat is just like any other cat — fascination with balls of yarn included! (Photo: nelik/Shutterstock)