With his rugged good looks and a checkered past, this guy is hard to resist

Jack the husky's outlaw status has earned him social media fame.

Mary Jo DiLonardo
November 30, 2017, 4:31 p.m.
Jack doesn't know what all the fuss is about; he's just chillin'. (Photo: Delaware Valley Siberian Husky Rescue)

Jack is a handsome husky with icy blue eyes and thick, luxurious fur. He's one of several dogs available for adoption from the Delaware Valley Siberian Husky Rescue (DVSHR).

Reading Jack's description, nearly any dog lover would be happy to add the furry pup to their pack. He's sweet and affectionate, housetrained and good in a crate. He even loves car rides. Sure, Jack pulls on the leash and can jump a four-foot fence from a standstill. Hardly dealbreakers.

But there's one interesting aside in Jack's bio that's causing quite a stir; it even making Jack a social media star of sorts.

"Unfortunately, due to some mischief that Jack got into when he was younger, he cannot legally be adopted or reside in the state of Maryland."

Well, that's intriguing, Jack. What exactly did you do?

"We actually don’t even know all of the details," Barbara Swanda of the DVSHR board of directors told MNN. "We just know he was involved in some sort of an incident with a goat."

They don't know if he chased a goat, injured a goat or was involved in a goat's demise, but a judge in Virginia (not Maryland) ruled that Jack would have to be euthanized unless he was moved from the state and, as part of the deal, he could not be adopted out to any state that touches Virginia's borders.

Because the only state DVSHR adopts to that abuts Virginia is Maryland, that's the only state it named in Jack's bio. They were trying to save interested adopters in Maryland from filling out applications, but it only made people insanely curious on social media about what Jack did to get himself banned.

Finding Jack a good home

Jack has been in foster care for about a year, which isn't that much longer than average, says Swanda. He's had several applications, but they were from people who either didn't have husky experience or didn't have adequate fencing.

"We're in the business of making sure it's the best fit for the dog and the family," Swanda says. "He's a very good dog."

Until he finds the perfect home, Jack is living with a foster family and several canine siblings. He's waiting for a great home in Eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Delaware, ideally without cats or small children and with a nice, tall fence.



Jack is a star — and not just because of his fetching good looks. (Photo: Delaware Valley Siberian Husky Rescue)

Jack likely doesn't even know about all his newfound social media fame. But his volunteer group has been swamped with people wanting to know exactly what the outlaw husky did.

"It's great that the story has gone viral and that people are finding it funny, but let's educate people how rescue comes to play and, in Jack's situation, it literally was a matter of life and death," says Swanda.

"The way to help if you're not just laughing and then moving on in your newsfeed is to volunteer just a little bit of time with a rescue or a shelter and, of course, donations are extremely important."