Myth-busting bathroom recyclables

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recycling
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Only about 20% of Americans consistently recycle in the bathroom. That’s why the Johnson & Johnson Family of Consumer Companies created the CARE TO RECYCLE® program and this quiz. See if you can separate the myths from the facts and start including the smallest room in the house in your recycling routine.

Question 1 of 9

Score: 0

plastics number 1 and number 2 recycling symbols
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Shampoo, conditioner and lotion bottles are different from juice bottles and milk jugs.

Myth

Most plastic bottles in the bathroom are made of either #1 (PET) or #2 (HDPE) plastic, the same as water or milk bottles. These two categories make up almost 96% of all the plastic bottles recycled in the US.* Look for #1 or #2 in the “chasing arrow” mark, and just be sure to remove any pumps before recycling.

*Source: SPI, Plastic Industry Trade Association, http://www.plasticsindustry.org/AboutPlastics/content.cfm?ItemNumber=1271&navItemNumber=1125.

Question 2 of 9

Score: 0

lotion
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The pumps found on plastic bottles are recyclable.

MYTH.

Pumps are made with a variety of components, including metal and different types of plastics that make them difficult to recycle. Therefore you should remove pumps before placing the bottle in the recycling bin.

Question 3 of 9

Score: 0

shampoo and other bottles
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I need to scrub out shampoo, lotion and liquid soap bottles before recycling them.

MYTH.

A quick rinse is all that is needed.

Question 4 of 9

Score: 0

recycle bin containing assorted packages
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Mouthwash bottles can be recycled, just like water and juice bottles.

FACT.

For recycling purposes, you can think of them the same way.

Question 5 of 9

Score: 0

mouthwash
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I need to remove all bottle labels before recycling plastic bottles.

MYTH.

Just as with water bottles and milk jugs, it’s not necessary to scrape the labels off bottles from the bathroom.

Question 6 of 9

Score: 0

toilet paper tubes
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Toilet paper rolls and BAND-AID® Brand Bandage cartons are accepted in most neighborhood recycling collections.

FACT.

Such materials are fiberboard, just like cereal and cracker boxes.

Question 7 of 9

Score: 0

closeup of toothpaste and toothbrush
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Toothpaste tubes can be recycled in most community recycling programs.

MYTH.

Most curbside recycling programs don’t accept toothpaste tubes because of the type of plastic laminate they are made from. If you buy toothpaste in a paperboard box, however, the box can go in the recycling bin.

Question 8 of 9

Score: 0

dental floss
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Dental floss containers can be recycled in most community recycling programs.

MYTH.

Dental floss containers are usually made with a mix of materials so, like pumps, they often are not collected in curbside recycling. Find out if your community collects these items or if not, where you can recycle them using this Recycling Locator.

Question 9 of 9

Score: 0

toilet paper
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Plastic wrap like that used for cotton ball and toilet paper packaging can only be recycled at drop-off locations, including major retailers.

FACT.

Plastic wrap can be recycled—but not usually from your curbside bin. Typically, it should be taken to drop-off locations, like local grocery stores, that accept plastic bags and film for recycling.

You scored out of 9
recycling
Photo: The Johnson & Johnson Family of Consumer Companies
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